NHS Creative | Watch the footy and know the score
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Watch the footy and know the score


NHS Creative has helped to launch a new campaign for Hampshire County Council that targets young men watching the World Cup in pubs across the county.
Special ‘Know the Score with Chlamydia’ scratch cards have been placed on bars in customised dispensers, supported by promotional bar runners, posters and mirror stickers across the venues.
The campaign material adorns a range of pubs across Hampshire for the full duration of the World Cup.
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The scratch cards pose a few key questions that upon revealing the answers will enable young people to work out whether they have been at risk of Chlamydia and therefore need to get tested.
Councillor Liz Fairhurst, Executive Member for Adult Social Care and Public Health said:

“We know that young men in Hampshire are less likely to have been tested for Chlamydia than young women. With the excitement of the World Cup, we are using this opportunity to explain the importance of regular testing to sexually active young men and young women, and how easy it is get a free testing kit by post or from a local community pharmacy.”

Around 2-3% of sexually active young people between the ages of 16 and 24 are known to be infected with Chlamydia. It is easily transmitted between partners through unprotected sex, and if undetected and untreated, can lead to infertility. Sexually active young people under the age of 25 are therefore advised to test at least annually or on each change of sexual partner.
So we are hoping that with the onset of World Cup fever, football supporters will be encouraged to know the score for sure, by getting tested for Chlamydia.
And given England’s abject performance at this year’s tournament, the scratch cards could at least provide a useful distraction from the disappointment of not getting beyond the group stages.
Find out more about the campaign here

Steve Hubbard